Frequently Asked Questions

Copyright

Yes! The Copyright Act allows you to play a sound recording or live radio broadcasts in class as long as it is for educational purposes, not for profit, on University premises, before an audience consisting primarily of students. However, if you...

Yes. You can photocopy and hand out copyrighted works as long as they fall within the guidelines listed in the Queen's Fair Dealing policy. If you want to hand out material that is in excess of these guidelines use the Copyright Advisory Office ...

Generally, you may include other people’s works in your classroom presentations without having to get permission or pay a fee provided there’s no commercial version available. Under the educational exemption in the Copyright Act, you may make...

In most cases, you own the copyright for the works you create at the university but there are a few exceptions. Please see the Intellectual Property Guidelines  of the Queen's School of Graduate Studies for more information.

All Copyright...

Moral rights are additional rights held by authors of literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works. They consist of rights that protect the integrity of a work and the reputation of its author. The right of attribution is the right to always be...

You ask! The Copyright Advisory Office does provide a service for getting permission to use copyrighted materials in your class. See our Clearance and Permissions services website for more information.  If you want to request permission for other...

The copyright laws in the U.S. and Canada are different. For example, the U.S. has a provision known as ‘fair use’ which is different from the Canadian equivalent (‘fair dealing’). If you are from the U.S. or are collaborating with a U.S....

Copyright is recognized internationally thanks to international conventions. So, generally, your copyright will be protected in other countries. In other countries, your copyright will be protected under that country’s laws so there may be some...

“Public domain” refers to works in which copyright has expired or where the copyright owner has made a clear declaration that they will not assert copyright in the work.

For example, although the copyright in Shakespeare’s plays expired...

At Queen’s, instructors own the teaching-related intellectual property that they create. Examples of these types of materials include lecture notes, PowerPoint presentations, lab manuals, syllabi and streamed lectures.

If you find your...