Frequently Asked Questions

Copyright

Copyright gives the copyright owner a number of legal rights, such as the right to copy and translate a work. In a university setting, the most pertinent rights are the right to reproduce the copyright-protected work and the right to communicate...

Contact Mark Swartz at the Copyright Advisory Office or your librarian if you have any copyright related questions.

Mark Swartz
Email: copy.right@queensu.ca
Phone: 613-533-6000 ext. 78510

To contact your librarian,...

Copyright protection arises automatically when any type of work is created and generally continues for 50 years after the author’s death, though this can depend on the type of work and where you want to use it . When you want to use a particular...

If the copying that you want to do falls outside of fair dealing, you will have to obtain permission from the copyright holder.

If you want to copy materials for handouts for your class, see the handouts section of our Copyright and Teaching...

Copyright protects literary, artistic, dramatic and musical works, as well as sound recordings, performances and communication signals. This encompasses a wide range of things, ranging from books, articles, posters, manuals and graphs, to CDs,...

Use of copyright materials at Queen's University is covered by the Canadian Copyright Act and various agreements and licences entered into by the University with copyright owners and representative organizations. The Copyright Act is the...

The Campus Bookstore and the AMS Publishing and Copy Centre are the two main providers of print coursepacks at Queen's University and will obtain permission for you.

Any materials that you would like to include in courseware are...

The Queen's University Library contracts with a variety of vendors and publishers to provide users with thousands of electronic resources (databases, e-journals, e-books, etc.) costing millions of dollars per year.

In addition to paying...

The Library has articles electronically transmitted to it from other libraries, and the current practice is that the Library then makes the articles available to the requestor in print. The Ontario university libraries (OCUL) are now exploring...

You can put the following items on course reserve in the library without requesting permission from a copyright holder.

Original works Personal materials of instructors, for which they own the copyright (e.g. assignment questions/solutions...