Frequently Asked Questions

Copyright

In most cases, you own the copyright for the works you create at the university but there are a few exceptions. Please see the Intellectual Property Guidelines  of the Queen's School of Graduate Studies for more information.

All Copyright...

Moral rights are additional rights held by authors of literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works. They consist of rights that protect the integrity of a work and the reputation of its author. The right of attribution is the right to always be...

You ask! The Copyright Advisory Office does provide a service for getting permission to use copyrighted materials in your class. See our Clearance and Permissions services website for more information.  If you want to request permission for other...

The copyright laws in the U.S. and Canada are different. For example, the U.S. has a provision known as ‘fair use’ which is different from the Canadian equivalent (‘fair dealing’). If you are from the U.S. or are collaborating with a U.S....

Copyright is recognized internationally thanks to international conventions. So, generally, your copyright will be protected in other countries. In other countries, your copyright will be protected under that country’s laws so there may be some...

“Public domain” refers to works in which copyright has expired or where the copyright owner has made a clear declaration that they will not assert copyright in the work.

For example, although the copyright in Shakespeare’s plays expired...

How long copyright lasts depends on which country you are in. In general terms, with the exception of performers’ performances, sound recordings and broadcast signals, the term of copyright lasts for the life of the author and a period of 50...

At Queen’s, instructors own the teaching-related intellectual property that they create. Examples of these types of materials include lecture notes, PowerPoint presentations, lab manuals, syllabi and streamed lectures.

If you find your...

Fair dealing is an exemption in the Copyright Act which allows you to use other people’s copyright material for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody, satire, criticism, review or news reporting, provided that what you do with...

Some key Queen's University resources are:

Copyright and Fair Dealing Copyright and Teaching Guide Copyright at Queen's Policy School of Graduate Studies Intellectual Property Guidelines

For other resources and links related to...