Frequently Asked Questions

Copyright

Copyright protects literary, artistic, dramatic and musical works, as well as sound recordings, performances and communication signals. This encompasses a wide range of things, ranging from books, articles, posters, manuals and graphs, to CDs,...

The licences for some of the e-journals provided by the Library allow instructors to upload articles into secure learning management systems such as those available through Queen's (Moodle/Desire2Learn/Medtech etc.). While there may be good...

I’ll be sure to cite where the figures came from.


In most cases, yes. In some cases, textbook publishers will allow you to include copies of figures in your PowerPoints and online classrooms, but usually only when the textbook is...

Yes, you can scan and post copyrighted works as long as they fall within the guidelines listed in the Queen's Fair Dealing policy. For materials that fall outside these guidelines, the Copyright Advisory Office is now offering a clearance service...

It depends on what you want to do. Materials on the internet are treated the same under copyright law as any other copyright materials, so if you want to use them, you have to either fall within one of the Act’s exceptions (such as fair dealing)...

The Fair Dealing policy permits a faculty member or administrative staff to make a copy of up to 10% of a copyright-protected audiovisual work for inclusion in a classroom presentation or in a learning management system. The Fair Dealing Policy...

Generally no, but you should check the website’s ‘Terms of Use’ section to see whether it has any specific linking prohibitions. If there are none, you may link to the website but make sure that the webpage opens up in a different browser window...

Only if you have the student’s permission. The Report of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Intellectual Property states that "the ownership of all types of intellectual property and for all members of the University should rest with the creators,...

Yes. Contact your liaison librarian and/or the Copyright Advisory Office for help with creating links to full-text digital resources in the library catalogue.

Copyright in the the Library (Reserves, Interlibrary Loan & E-Resources)...

Yes, you are free to create a direct link yourself, although you might want to consider reasons to have the Library do it for you. As well as saving you time, there are two advantages to having the Library create the link. The first is that...