Frequently Asked Questions

Copyright

You can put the following items on course reserve in the library without requesting permission from a copyright holder.

Original works Personal materials of instructors, for which they own the copyright (e.g. assignment questions/solutions...

The Library has articles electronically transmitted to it from other libraries, and the current practice is that the Library then makes the articles available to the requestor in print. The Ontario university libraries (OCUL) are now exploring...

The Queen's University Library contracts with a variety of vendors and publishers to provide users with thousands of electronic resources (databases, e-journals, e-books, etc.) costing millions of dollars per year.

In addition to paying...

The Campus Bookstore and the AMS Publishing and Copy Centre are the two main providers of print coursepacks at Queen's University and will obtain permission for you.

Any materials that you would like to include in courseware are...

If the copying that you want to do falls outside of fair dealing, you will have to obtain permission from the copyright holder.

If you want to copy materials for handouts for your class, see the handouts section of our Copyright and Teaching...

Contact Mark Swartz at the Copyright Advisory Office or your librarian if you have any copyright related questions.

Mark Swartz
Email: copy.right@queensu.ca
Phone: 613-533-6000 ext. 78510

To contact your librarian,...

Queen’s University Library is offering an e-reserve service called Ares. Through Ares e-reserve, the library will: 

Scan print books and journal articles that meet the requirements listed in the Queen's Fair Dealing Policy Acquire and...

Some key Queen's University resources are:

Copyright and Fair Dealing Copyright and Teaching Guide Copyright at Queen's Policy School of Graduate Studies Intellectual Property Guidelines

For other resources and links related to...

Yes, there is a difference. Posting something on your own website means you are making the work available world-wide. Wide distribution makes relying on fair dealing more complicated and use like this is not generally covered by any University...

Yes. There’s a wealth of material out there which is either in the public domain or available under what is known as Creative Commons licensing, which generally means the work is available for free, subject to certain limited conditions, such as...