Kinesiology

This page will help you to identify key starting points for your research related to Kinesiology. 

The Kinesiology liaison librarian is available for research consultation and can help you design research strategies, access key databases, and effectively use the information resources of Queen's University Library and beyond.  

Here are the key starting points for your research in kinesiology.

Subject guides are created by the librarians at Queen's University Library to help you identify, access and understand the literature of a discipline.  

The Kinesiology and Physical Education Subject Guide is the best place to find resources in the field of kinesiology. Other guides may also be relevant to your research.

ERIC

Publication coverage: 1966 - present

Gender Studies Database

Publication coverage: 1972 - present

MEDLINE

Publication coverage: Ovid MEDLINE(R) Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Ovid MEDLINE(R) 1946 to Present

Ovid MEDLINE ® covers the international literature on biomedicine, including the allied health fields and the biological and physical sciences, humanities, and information science as they relate to medicine and health care. Information is indexed from approximately 5,600 journals published world-wide.

Physical Education Index

Publication coverage: 1970 - present

Indexes peer-reviewed journals, report literature, conference proceedings, trade magazines, patents, popular press, and more.

PsycINFO

Publication coverage: 1806-

Sociological Abstracts

Publication coverage: 1952 - present

SportDiscus

Publication coverage: 1800 - present

The SPORTDiscus database covers key areas of sports medicine and related fields. Content areas range from sports physiology and sports psychology to physical education and recreation. SPORTDiscus is ideal for researchers studying different aspects of fitness, health and sport studies.
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Library Services Phishing Attack

On Thursday, April 12th, a malicious email was sent to members of the Queen's community indicating that their access to the library will soon expire. This is a phishing attack intended to trick users into providing their credentials, and is not a message from the library.

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Library Journal Input

Queen’s University Library is asking all Queen’s researchers to review and comment on the Queen’s results of the national Journal Usage Project to provide further input about which journals are most...

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Subject Specialists

Our librarians provide information expertise for research and teaching in your field. You can use our email form to contact a specialist in this area.